You just might be responsible for Nigeria’s systemic failure!

Starting in November 2014, I continually lamented the failure of the Abuja Electricity Distribution Company (AEDC) to provide power in the Estate where I reside. About 3 weeks into the power outage, we decided to give the gen a rest and moved to Jos for the holidays especially as the AEDC technicians had mentioned that if they could not repair the fault by December 23rd, the components for fixing will not arrive until January 2015.

Ten days into the power outage, I had written letters of complaint to the Consumer Protection Council (CPC) and the Nigerian Electricity Regulatory Commission (NERC). Continue reading

Happy New Year! And a new SMS Broadcast app

After several years without a mobile application, we now have a Tinitop SMS app for Android.

The beta version of this app works with accounts from http://classic.naijanimi.com New users need to first create account at http://classic.naijanimi.com

*Update January 16: The more recent version available at https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tinitopsms.main allows new users to signup from within the app. Continue reading

The Trickery of Nigerian Politics

Sadly, in Nigeria of 2014 there aren’t any real political “parties” or ideologies beyond personal stomachs of their leaderships… what we have at the moment are platforms for people to stand on based on convenience. The power brokers are the same old ones and a few of their proteges.

Until the masses are enlightened enough to take their future in their hands rather than work for the power brokers (whatever convenient garb they may be putting on today), nothing is going to change.

As the country is today, a smart president and his crew may outfox the entire citizenry for a long while, a docile president may be outfoxed by the powers that be, and an incorruptible president may not be able to outmaneuver the institutionalized corruption/stealing that has now been enshrined in a system called democracy which the people have no user guide for. Personally, i think the user guide has been deliberately hidden.

Anyone that really means well for Nigeria will start to enlighten the people on at least some of the following:

  • how the democratic system of government is actually supposed to work;
  • how to monitor and manage local government officials;
  • how to hold municipal agencies accountable;
  • how to participate in the making of laws at the state and federal levels;
  • who and what the houses of assembly are actually supposed to represent;
  • how to understand budgets and track implementation beyond the complex sheets of paper that are presented yearly;
  • how to provide meaningful input to governance;
  • avenues for seeking audience when the proscribed channels do not work, etc etc.

When we learn most of these, we may become powerful enough to truly support leaders with good intentions and get rid of poor leadership.

But of course, it’s not in the best interest of the usual suspects (whether or not they are in the opposition at that point in time) that the masses gain enough understanding that they will be able to oppose them when in power. Their mantra rather is to inform the masses about enough shortcomings of the other guy so they hate him enough to go vote against him. Even when the enlightenment does not directly affect their own positions, they do not want to disrupt the structures that (may) indirectly support them.

Who is going to enlighten Nigerians unselfishly and get us out of this mess? Or rather, what can be done if anything outside the regular politickry?

Until we start to participate in governance and become the watchdogs, we will keep wishing in vain.